• Eleni Pacheco, BA

Communication Is Power. Consent is Mandatory.

Updated: Feb 11

By Eleni Pacheco

Since the #MeToo movement began, conversations about consent have erupted across the nation.


We now know that teaching consent - or giving permission for something - is about much more than saying “yes” or “no” to sex. Consent is about setting personal limits and creating boundaries in our relationships. Whether talking to a toddler, teenager, or young adult, teaching youth these fundamental ideas about healthy and unhealthy relationships empowers them with skills and options when they are faced with big decisions.


Starting the conversation when you have no blueprint to go off of can be hard. We've got a few guidelines to follow that will help you kick start your understanding of sexual consent:

  • Consent is about everyone involved in a sexual or possibly sexual encounter

  • Consent can always be withdrawn

  • Nothing makes consent automatic or unnecessary

  • In some situations, full, informed, and free consent cannot be truly given or shared

  • Nonconsent means STOP

  • A lack of “no” does not mean “yes”

Parents and families play a major role in teaching and modeling consent for the next generation, not only in reducing teen and unplanned pregnancy but in preparing young people to communicate limits throughout their lives. It takes a village to empower youth to make healthy, informed decisions about sex and relationships.

But how can we do this? Check out Power to Decide’s recently published article for a few examples.


For a more local perspective, check out Texas Monthly’s recent article featuring Healthy Futures of Texas founder, Dr. Janet Realini, and her take on teaching young people in Texas.

0 views

© 2020 by Healthy Futures of Texas

put-gold-seal.png
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
SA2020_Certified_Awesome_FINAL[1].png